A fire at the Brooklyn Theater in New York kills nearly 300 people and injures hundreds more on December 5, 1876. Some victims perished from a combination of burns and smoke inhalation; others were trampled to death in the general panic that ensued.

History.com

During the reading of the information provided you may find common use emotive langue to explain the actions of those attending. We will share snippets of the pages linked to.

A Memorial Website to the Victims of the Brooklyn Theater Fire of 1876

Learn about the history of the fire and its victims

A fire at the Brooklyn Theater in New York kills nearly 300 people and injures hundreds more on December 5, 1876. Some victims perished from a combination of burns and smoke inhalation; others were trampled to death in the general panic that ensued.

It is difficult to discuss calmly the frightful disaster which happened in Brooklyn on Tuesday night. No such awful sacrifice of human life has ever been known in this country, shipwreck and the casualties of war alone being excepted. – New York Times editorial, Dec. 7, 1876 

Labeled “Brooklyn’s Holocaust” by the December 7, 1876 National Republican, the Brooklyn Theater Fire was one of the most devastating fires in U.S. history. The fire began when a piece of scenery caught fire and fell on the stage. In a little over 10 minutes, the fire was out of control and the audience thrown into a panic. People clogged stairwells and trampled fellow patrons in an attempt to flee the spreading flames. When it was all said and done, almost 300 people had been claimed by the fire. Read more about it!

A Frightful Disaster,” 

Evening Star, (Washington, D.C.) , December 6, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 6.

A Theater in Flames,” 

New-York Tribune, (New York, N.Y.) , December 6, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 4-5.

Theater Burned,” 

Public Ledger, (Memphis, Tenn.) , December 6, 1876, Page 2, Image 2, Col. 2-3.

The Brooklyn Theater Burned,” 

The Cincinnati Daily Star, (Cincinnati, Ohio) , December 6, 1876, Third Edition, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 4-5.

An Awful Calamity,” 

Memphis Daily Appeal, (Memphis, Tenn.) , December 7, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 4-5.

The Awful Disaster of the Brooklyn Theater,” 

New-York Tribune, (New York, N.Y.), December 7, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 3-5.

Brooklyn’s Holocaust,” 

National Republican, (Washington D.C.) , December 7, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 6.

The Brooklyn Fire,” 

The Cincinnati Daily Star, (Cincinnati, Ohio), December 7, 1876, Third Edition, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 4-5.

Brooklyn Horror,” 

Memphis Daily Appeal, (Memphis, Tenn.) , December 8, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 5-6.

The Great Catastrophe,” 

New-York Tribune, (New York, N.Y.) , December 9, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 4-6.

Appalling Loss of Life in Brooklyn New York ,” 

The Wichita City Eagle, (Wichita, Kan.) , December 14, 1876, Page 1, Image 1, Col. 8-9.

The date was Tuesday, Dec. 5, 1876–95 years ago today—and the Brooklyn Theatre fire was begin ning, one of the world’s most terrible theater fire disasters, claiming “doubt less over 300 deaths” according to the city regis trar. Just 100 years ago, in 1871, the theater had been built at the spendthrift cost of $127,000; it survived only five years, never breaking even financially, before its tragic destruction.

When the newspapers came out the morning after the Brooklyn Theater fire, headlines shouted, “No Fatalities!”  However, the reality was much different.  With a building touted as having the best fire exits in the city by the fire chief, what happened to cause this catastrophe?

Brooklyn’s theaters have provided entertainment for almost as long as there has been a city of Brooklyn. Until the invention of the moving picture show, the theater could house all kinds of entertainment, from symphonies and opera, to serious drama, to comedies, vaudeville and minstrel shows.

The Brooklyn Theater Fire. Brooklyn, N.Y. Dec 5, 1876…America’s Fourth Worst Loss Of Life In A Building Fire.

The Brooklyn Theater Fire
December 5th, 1876
 Brooklyn, New York
disasteroushistory.blogspot.com

The Entertainment Industry is not a new invention…not by a long shot. By the late 19th century entertainment was very much a part of the urban life-style and, while no one who attended a play in 1876 could have even dreamed of the technology we take for granted today, many of ‘The Industry’s’ best-loved quirks and features were still already in place by that time, and had been for a century or three. You just had to substitute the word ‘play’ for the word ‘movie’.

DECEMBER 7, 1876


THE NEW YORK HERALD, December 7, 1876

* Brooklyn Theater Fire
* Lengthy report
* NYC paper

Translate »