Kumbh Mela crowd incident 10/02/2013

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Allahabad stampede kills 36 Kumbh Mela pilgrims

ALLAHABAD (Reuters) – A stampede at a railway station in Allahabad killed at least 36 Hindu pilgrims on Sunday, the busiest day of the Kumbh Mela at which some 30 million had gathered to wash away their sins in the sacred Ganges river.

CAG report blames railways for 2013 Kumbh Mela stampede

The lack of proper coordination and disaster management plan on the part of railways resulted in the stampede at Allahabad station during last year’s Maha Kumbh Mela in which 37 persons were killed, the CAG has said.

More Than Two Dozen Killed in Kumbh Mela Stampede

ALLAHABAD, Uttar Pradesh — As many as 30 people were killed Sunday in a stampede at a train station here as millions gathered for a Hindu religious festival.

How the deadly stampede outside the Kumbh Mela could have been avoided

A tragic stampede at a rail station killed 36 people and injured many more yesterday in the city of Allahabad in central India. They were pilgrims journeying home from the Hindu mega festival known as the Kumbh Mela, believed to be the largest human gathering in history.

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At least 36 people crushed to death in stampede at railway station

At least 36 people were killed and 30 more injured after a stampede in an Indian town where millions of Hindus had gathered for a religious festival.

The Kumbh Mela stampede: disaster preparedness must bridge jurisdictions

On 10 February 2013 a stampede at a railway station in Allahabad, killed 36 passengers and injured many more. The victims were pilgrims returning from the Kumbh Mela, a 55 day Hindu festival where tens of millions of people congregate once every 12 years at the confluence of the Ganga, Yamuna, and (mythical) Saraswati rivers for a dip in the holy waters. Unlike spontaneous mass gatherings, which are inherently conducive to stampedes, the Kumbh Mela stands out as a highly organised, well orchestrated, administrative accomplishment. What makes it less unusual are the unforeseen gaps—forged by jurisdictional blind spots—common to disaster planning everywhere

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